What Is The Arbor of a Saw Blade?

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Numerous industries rely on the precision and stability of a miter saw to complete cuts through a variety of substrates, most notably wood. A miter’s circular saw blade uses a feature called the arbor for appropriate fitting and security. It’s crucial to know your saw’s arbor requirements, but sometimes it can be difficult to understand the exact match depending on other factors. To help, York Saw & Knife Co, Inc. has created a primer that explains arbors in detail.

A Saw Blade’s Arbor – What Is It?

You’ll notice that blades need support in their center to connect with the rest of a saw assembly. A shaft — also referred to as a spindle or mandrel — protrudes from the assembly to form what we refer to as the arbor. It’s typically the motor shaft, which utilizes a particular design for blade mounting. The motor drives the arbor and causes the saw blade to rotate safely.

What Is the Arbor Hole?

The center hole is technically considered the arbor hole. It’s essential to understand the connection between the bore and the shaft. You’ll need to know the shaft’s diameter when you’re selecting a blade, as a precise fit between the two will ensure steady spin and cut efficiency.

Types of Blades That Have an Arbor

Beyond miter saw blades, most circular blades utilize arbors to achieve their desired results. Popular examples include:

  • Carbide saw blades
  • Concrete saw blades
  • Abrasive saw blades
  • Panel saw blades
  • Table saw blades
  • Worm drive saws blades

Common Sizes of Arbor Holes

The size of an arbor hole on a circular saw blade will vary depending on the blade’s outside diameter. As the scale increases or decreases, the arbor hole generally follows suit.

For standard 8″ and 10″ blades, arbor hole diameters typically sit at 5/8″. Other blade sizes and their arbor hole diameters are as follows:

  • 3″ blade size = 1/4″ arbor
  • 6″ blade size = 1/2″ arbor
  • 7 1/4″ to 10″ blade sizes = 5/8″ arbor
  • 12″ to 16″ blade sizes = 1″ arbor

Always keep an eye on saw blades that follow the metric system, as you’ll see variations from Europe and Asia. They do have millimeter variations that translate to American arbors, however. For example, the American 5/8″ converts to 15.875mm for European standards.

Arbors are also featured on a worm drive saw — a commonly used, handheld carpentry tool — which is unique in the regard that they use a diamond-shaped arbor hole to facilitate higher generated torque.

Contact York Saw & Knife for Help Selecting an Arbored Saw Blade

If you need a replacement saw blade that features an arbor, York Saw & Knife Co, Inc. will deliver and help you fill your requirements. All of our products are made in the United States, and we supply high-quality industrial cutting solutions for many types of clients. We even offer custom solutions for any application, ensuring that we’ll have the fit for you no matter your application.

If you’d like to discuss circular saw blades with our knowledgeable customer service team, contact us today!

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